Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Enosi plans to open source V1.0 in Q4 2018. V1.0 will be open to the growing list of Enosi partners, including foundation partner Solar Analytics (a peer-to-peer solar service for 20,000+ customers and households across Australia).


Enosi will then expand interstate and globally, with other state-based energy grids, working with partners to adapt the software for individual markets. The Enosi Foundation will leverage local development teams across the globe.

Grid 2.0 is an electricity distribution model where a much larger proportion of energy is generated at the edge of the grid - closer to the demand.  It integrates local solar generation, battery storage and demand management technologies to actively manage the supply/demand balance and extract the most efficient outcome for all grid participants.

Enosis believes that the most efficient allocation of these distributed resources will be achieved through marketplaces at the retail end, integrating with wholesale markets to achieve the optimal balance.
Grid 2.0 is the path to providing low cost, clean and reliable electricity globally to all.

In our early years of operation the Enosi foundation intends to directly support our retail partners. As we expand, the process of establishing a neo-retailing operation, or even an EDAO, will also be automated.

Consumers will join using mobile or web applications provided by neo-retailers. In the early years of operation enosi will support neo-retailers by providing dApps and directing potential customers to the available energy communities. The sign-up process will be simple and compelling, allowing users to either set-and-forget their trading preferences, or take a proactive role in their energy community.

Enosi will only collect a small clip from JOUL transactions, sufficient to fund its ongoing support operations as a global foundation. The foundation will ultimately be focused on supporting a global network of open-source developers.

  • Virtual Net Metering, Community energy and Peer-to-Peer schemes on private permissioned blockchain
  • Separation of energy retail and wholesale access functions
  • Bundling of energy with non-energy products, services and community value propositions (eg solar PV installation, Business Cooperatives, Electric Vehicle Charging, Property Development, Schools and Charities, Residential communities)
  • Fractionalisation of solar farm output

Barriers to entry for

  • small licensed retail energy providers include licencing requirements, prudential requirements, wholesale trading risks, scale economies, credit risks, customer acquisition costs.
  • unlicensed retail and community organisations include costs and licencing requirements, wholesale market access and risk
  • innovative technologies include poor incentives for incumbents, pilot project paralysis, restricted channel to market via monopolies/oligopolies

Our use cases address these barriers through a combination of

  • business model innovation (splitting customer acquisition and service from wholesale and grid access)
  • use of an innovative collateral staking model
  • access to very low cost software services to address scale barriers.

Community and P2P trading requires trustless networks, immutability of records and shared view of transactions particularly for metering data and trading rules.
In particular, people trading energy need to be assured that no-one is selling the same kWh twice.  This is called the 'double spend problem' and was famously dealt with in the original Bitcoin/blockchain treatise.

Enosi model requires collaboration with

  1. a licensed retail supplier to provide access for community members to grid services and wholesale energy
  2. "Neo-retailers" - community and commercial organisations who will deploy the Enosi platform for their members/customers' use.
    One example is a Canadian utility (a licensed supplier) working with property development/management group (neo-retailer) to allow solar community homeowners to sell excess electricity to each other, before the local power company.
  • Engagement through industry associations, trade shows, typical B2B network effects.
  • Supporting our neo-retailers with direct and public marketing campaigns
  • Our licensed suppliers need to deal with the regulatory rules, and satisfy themselves that our software (and the neo-retailers) maintain compliance with all regulations and consumer protections

Generally no, in markets that have opened to retail competition (ie ~ 600 million customers in UK, Europe, Japan, Australia, Singapore and parts of North America)

Nevertheless some retail electricity markets are not open for retail level competition, and this means that our model must gain the cooperation of the local monopoly retail supplier (generally referred to as the distributor).
That's Ok if the distributor has progressive views, willingness and incentives to establish community energy schemes within their territory (such as London Hydro, Ontario).  But that is not typically the case.

Further it is our experience that monopoly providers rarely have such incentives, and will have severe restrictions and delays in terms of determining which solutions to adopt (needing to provide a 'level playing field' for all competing solutions).  This makes for a no winner or else a winner takes all, situation in terms of deploying a particular platform for the territory.

Therefore deployment of Enosi’s business model innovation will benefit from the on-going global trends towards:

  1. Regulatory systems with full retail contestability open the door to competition and innovation in community energy schemes (now that blockchain can solve the trust issues)
  2. Full deployment of smart meters (and access to the data by the customers and/or the a platform with the customers' permission)
  3. Network access tariffs that do not distort the value of energy services available.