Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Enosi is a Greek word meaning ‘community’ or ‘joining together’.

Energy retailers and community organisations are working with Enosi to enable customers without solar to buy renewable energy direct from solar farms, wind farms and other customers rather than a traditional energy company.

The Platform is purpose-built to help enable a world where almost everyone can generate, store or at least control their electricity use. As solar rooftops, battery systems and electric vehicles proliferate, Enosi allows communities members to trade energy between themselves no matter where on the grid they are located. These communities may be completely open or organised through a “neo-retailer”.

The Platform will enable:

  • Solar farm direct: Customers without the ability to install rooftop solar can buy energy directly from a participating solar or wind farm at wholesale prices. The renewable generator can improve their yield while the customers have a proven source of green energy at less than retail prices;
  • Rooftop Direct: Customers can trade energy in a "peer-to-peer" fashion across the existing grid. Anyone with rooftop solar, can sell their power to others participating in the scheme.
  • Neo-retailers: Organisations can set up their own community schemes, using the Enosi platform to access retail markets in new ways. Community groups, schools and businesses can facilitate an energy community among their members. These ’neo-retailers’ will no longer be restricted to selling their energy to an energy company or the wholesale market but instead can sell their energy directly to customers they identify.

The delivery of these products through the Platform will revolutionise the energy market. Such a model will hasten the development of what is called Grid 2.0, characterised by decentralised, cleaner, cheaper, closer-to-the-demand energy generation.

The Enosi model requires collaboration with

  1. Licensed retail suppliers (such as Energy Locals) to provide access for community members to grid services and wholesale energy when not enough solar is available;
  2. "Neo-retailers" - community and commercial organisations who will deploy the Enosi platform for their members/customers' use.
  3. Solar and Wind Farms – larger scale commercial operators who sell their output direct to consumers through their neo-retailer or community.

One example might be a small utility company (a licensed supplier) working with property development/management group (neo-retailer) to allow solar community homeowners to sell excess electricity to each other, before the local power company.

  • Our licensed suppliers need to deal with the regulatory rules and satisfy themselves that our software (and the neo-retailers) maintain compliance with all regulations and consumer protections.
  • Engagement through industry associations, trade shows, typical B2B network effects.
  • Enosi will facilitate our energy communities gaining access to the best retail deals and wholesale renewable energy contracts

In our early years of operation, Enosi intends to directly support our retail partners and community organisations. They just need to get in touch directly with our team. As we expand, the process of establishing a neo-retailing operation will also be automated. The Neo Retailer in this model looks after the community members while a licenced retail supplier is responsible for access to the wholesale market and ensuring that regulatory conditions are fulfilled.

Consumers are joining using mobile or web applications provided through our retail and neo-retail partners. In the early years of operation Enosi will also support neo-retailers by directing potential customers to the available energy communities. The sign-up process is simple and compelling, allowing users to either set-and-forget their trading preferences, or take a proactive role in their energy community.

  • Solar and Wind Farm direct solutions where consumer groups are organised to buy direct from a large renewable producer at a price that both increases the return for renewable investment and reduces the consumers' bill.
  • Virtual Net Metering, Community energy and Peer-to-Peer schemes on private permissioned blockchain.
  • Separation of energy retail and wholesale access functions.
  • Bundling of energy with non-energy products, services and community value propositions (e.g., solar PV installation, Business Cooperatives, Electric Vehicle Charging, Property Development, Schools and Charities, Residential communities).
  • Fractionalisation of solar farm, wind farm and grid-scale battery outputs.

Problems and barriers include

  • barriers to small licensed retail energy providers include licencing requirements, prudential requirements, wholesale trading risks, scale economies, credit risks, customer acquisition costs.
  • barriers to unlicensed retail and community organisations include costs and licencing requirements, wholesale market access and risk
  • barriers to innovative technologies include poor incentives for incumbents, pilot project paralysis, restricted channel to market via monopolies/oligopolies

Our use cases address these barriers through a combination of

  • business model innovation (splitting customer acquisition and service from wholesale and grid access)
  • use of an innovative collateral staking model
  • access to low-cost software services to address scale barriers.

Community and P2P trading require trustless networks, immutability of records and shared view of transactions, particularly for metering data and trading rules.

In particular, people trading energy need to be assured that no other entity is selling the same kWh twice. This is called the 'double spend problem' and was famously dealt with in the original Bitcoin/blockchain treatise.

Generally; No, in markets that have opened to retail competition (There are approximately 600 million potential customers in such markets in the UK, Europe, Japan, Australia, Singapore and parts of North America)

Nevertheless, some retail electricity markets are not open for retail level competition, and this means that our model must gain the cooperation of the local monopoly retail supplier (generally referred to as the distributor).

This is tenable if the distributor has progressive views, willingness and incentives to establish community energy schemes within their territory. But that is not typically the case.

Further it is our experience that monopoly providers rarely have such incentives and will have severe restrictions and delays in terms of determining which solutions to adopt (needing to provide a 'level playing field' for all competing solutions). This makes for a “no winner” or else a “winner takes all” situation in terms of deploying a particular platform for the territory.

Therefore, deployment of Enosi’s business model innovation will benefit from the on-going global trends towards:

  1. Regulatory systems with full retail contestability open the door to competition and innovation in community energy schemes (now that blockchain can solve the trust issues);
  2. Full deployment of smart meters (and access to the data by the customers and/or the platform with the customers' permission); and
  3. Network access tariffs that do not distort the value of energy services available.

The Platform is unique in both its technical architecture and business model application. While other companies have developed retail energy platforms and even peer-to-peer trading solutions, the Platform’s combination of technology and disruptive enablement provides the means for market adoption to grow in an organic way, enhanced by the network effects of both the end-user functionality and the leverage of the Neo Retailer partnership model.

Specifically,

  1. Enosi enables trading directly across the grid without the need to do a special deal with the grid owner or configure customers into a micro-grid. This means, with the cooperation of a licenced retailer, we can enable any producer (even large solar and wind farms) to sell direct to consumers
  2. The Neo Retailer concept provides a means of lowering customer acquisition costs, reducing churn, and through bundling electricity contracts with other Neo Retailer products and services, creates a stronger value proposition for end-users to join the Platform than traditional retail price-driven competition;
  3. The use of an access stake on the Platform creates a pool of collateral conditionally available to eco-system participants to lower entry barriers, reduce operational risks, and support working capital requirements.

Further comparisons of Enosi with other platforms are outlined on Enosi’s Medium Blog.